Wildlife
The Sumatran Tiger

The Sumatran Tiger

The Sumatran Tiger

The Sumatran Tiger is a uncommon tiger subspecies that resides in the Indonesian island of Sumatra. It was categorize as vitally rare by IUCN in 2008 as the inhabitants was approximated at 441 to 679 individuals, with no subpopulation bigger than 50 individuals and a waning trend.
The Sumatran tiger is the only existing member of the Sunda Islands set of tigers that integrated the now vanished Bali tiger and Javan tiger. Sequences from entire mitochondrial genes of 34 tigers sustain the hypothesis that Sumatran tigers are analytically different from mainland populations.
Pocock first explained the Sumatran tiger on the foundation of some skull, pelage and striping characters in which it is diverse from the Indian and Javan tigers. It is darker in fur colour and has broader stripes than the Javan tiger. Stripes are disposed to crumble into spots close to their ends, and lines of little dark specks between normal stripes may be established on the back, flanks and hind legs. The rate of stripes is higher than in other subspecies.